A Shotgun, The Wrong Insulin, and Scene Safety

With the conclusion of Christmas comes a strange time. The post dopamine rush of opening gifts, and subsequent loss of euphoria with post-Christmas credit card statements. With that said, tonight’s shift would not disappoint.

It all started with some light rain on a damp evening. I picked up a 12-hour night shift in an attempt to help cope with my own loss of Christmas euphoria. The air had a moist cold chill to it. It truly felt like a great shift to stay in quarters with a warm cup of coffee. As usual as soon as I hit the recliner the tones dropped.

This call was interesting. It was an accidental altered level of consciousness. This one stands out because of the scene safety aspect of the call. Some things can easily be forgotten when that friendly old lady calls for help, or when you just wake up and have a case of bed head and limited cognitive function. In a nutshell this patient was mildly altered, intoxicated and had a bit of a temper when we suggested transport. After attempting to convince the patient to get checked out and dodging belligerent alcohol flavored out bursts for at least the last thirty minutes we finally convinced him to get checked out.

I grabbed the thousand milliliter bag of saline and moved around to the far side of the patient. I moved around to the far side of the patient I noticed a large machete and black pump action shotgun. Both weapons were easily within arm length. It’s one of those things that could have changed the outcome of the call. If the patient truly wanted he could have smoked one of the first responding crew members who entered. The outcome in this case was positive but it was a friendly reminder to always do a quick three sixty of your environment or scene and to never let your guard down no matter how nice the patient appears.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *